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Noisetrade – A Hidden Gem for Book Marketing


by Bryan Heathman

The Author’s Dream

There you are, sipping coffee and cognac by the stone fireplace at a lodge near Neuchâtel, Switzerland. Your muscles are warm and loose from a day of skiing, and your mind is on the fine meal planned for the evening.

Recent sales of your best seller have funded this little getaway, and you can’t believe how easily – how quickly – it all came together. It was all so sudden.

You lean back, gazing out the window at the gently falling snow, and smile. Yes, you can trace it all back to that one pivotal moment, the one when you decided to give away copies of your book on Noisetrade. After all, doesn’t everyone?

“If only they knew it was this easy,” you muse, “then everyone really would be doing it.” The sweet aroma of the steam fills your senses while the down-stuffed armchair cradles you in comfort. The thought whispers at the edge of your mind, “Yes, it is truly a good life…”

CLANK!

You’re startled awake with a clatter. The spoon you used to stir your powdered instant Swiss mocha mix has fallen to the kitchen floor, jostling you back to the reality of the moment: the onerous task of writing your book marketing plan.

If you don’t figure out some way to build your readership, your dreams of Swiss-inspired success are hosed. You might as well use those overstock copies of your ebook to fuel the virtual fireplace app on your smartphone. Not glamorous. Not at all.

Using Noisetrade to Build Your Best-Seller Dream

Using Noisetrade can be one great step on the journey to market your book. Noisetrade is an author-driven marketplace for ebooks and audiobooks. Rather than direct commerce, contributors are rewarded through donations that readers make on the honor system.

For example, a reader downloads a juicy sci-fi novel and has the option to pay for it after the aliens have been summarily dealt with. Score one for the author.

Authors can build an audience by giving away full-length ebooks or audiobooks, or alternatively authors offer sample chapters. Readers can find fiction, non-fiction, study guides, graphic novels and audiobooks galore. It’s the utopian version of Amazon.com without the coffee makers, winter coats and toy ads.

And it’s true: Noisetrade can be cool. When I work with authors to develop and execute their marketing plans, we do use NoiseTrade, but not for its idealistic original intent. Putting partial ebooks and audiobooks on this site has generated hundreds to thousands of new subscribers to email lists for many of my authors. Here’s how it works.

When a reader selects a book to download, they are prompted to make a choice from the pop-up window. They can either log in with Facebook credentials, use their free Noisetrade account, or download anonymously as a guest.

Those who log in are prompted to join the author’s mailing list and agree to receive email from them. After that, the author is free to build a relationship and market to them as often as they wish.

The Reality

This is a great email list-building tactic, but a horrible tactic for generating revenue when you post your entire book.

Noisetrade is not a good platform for making pots of money and retiring to the slopes of Neuchâtel. For one thing, the appeal for consumers is that the downloads are free. This attracts freebie-seekers.

Even though the Noisetrade site advises users to leave a tip (and they recommend an amount), the timing of their recommendation sucks. The pop-up asks for the money before the meal – before the reader has a chance to be inspired, amused, educated or tickled by the enormity of the author’s wit. Who’s going to pay for a sci-fi novel when they aliens haven’t been vanquished yet? Most authors don’t include a payment link at the end of their book, so the sale is lost.

If you can keep this in perspective, you can capitalize on Noisetrade’s innate sexiness as a marketing tool. Our best success has come from this model, or recipe, for using Noisetrade to promote books:

  • Give away book 1, and publish links to purchase books 2 & 3
  • Get email addresses when people download your ebook/audiobook
  • Add these emails to your email database and wow your subscribers with your clever words

Noisetrade is great for getting your creative works into the hands of consumers, building your mailing list and staying in touch with them. If you keep this in mind as you use Noisetrade to market yourself, you can maximize its potential and start adding a little VSOP to your afternoon coffee. Santé!




Bryan Edired 1Bryan Heathman is the President of Made for Success Publishing. Bryan works with bestselling authors in the role of publisher and marketer, including the late Zig Ziglar, Chris Widener and John C. Maxwell. Bryan is the author of Conversion Marketing, a marketing book that condenses knowledge on website conversion from 7-years running an online ad agency. Bryan’s Fortune 500 experience includes running high impact marketing campaigns for Microsoft, Eastman Kodak and Xerox.






Katherine-Owen-ImageBrought to you by Katherine Owen, CEO of GOKO. Katherine brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. She owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.


icon1October 13, 2015
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Traditional Media Exposure = Rocket Fuel for Your Book Launch


by Bryan Heathman

There are several thousand ways to successfully publicize a book that I’m aware of, and some are more effective than others. For example, you can promote your book by selling it back-of-room during speaking engagements, and you may actually make thousands of sales this way. The problem with this approach is that your own involvement limits the number of sales you can make, as the opportunities to speak are scarce… as is your time. This “scarcity principle” applies other marketing tactics I’ve seen authors use – not just public speaking engagements.

Imagine how much more effective your marketing efforts will be when you invest your time instead of spending it. Think of the activities you can do that will offer you leverage. Using traditional media such as radio, TV and print can give you massive leverage.

By putting your book in the hands of other people who can reach a large audience for you, you are leveraging their audience. Imagine sitting down for an interview with a radio talk show host. How many people can you reach in one 10-minute chat? What would audiences for your book look like if a dozen radio shows picked up a press release you distributed? How might your book launch change if your interview became syndicated? What would a stint on Good Morning America do for your sales?

Traditional Publicity Doesn’t Have To Mean Boring

Using traditional media such as radio, television, newsprint and magazine exposure for your book can make or break your sales numbers. This is anything but boring. By distributing your book through channels that will automatically publicize your work to large groups of people, you are investing your time and resources wisely. Let’s take a look at how you can apply this kind of leverage to your Book Marketing Plan.

Whether you’re looking for a burst of heat from your initial book launch, or your topic is evergreen and you’ve got your eye on long tail sales, publicity can give you the leverage you need to put your book into the hands of readers. Social media and other interactive types of publicity are great for this.

Yet for most authors who take the time to draft a Book Marketing Plan, somehow traditional publicity keeps getting lost in the mix. Despite the prevalence of social media in our daily lives, traditional media is still not only an effective publicity generator, it’s often the most effective way to sell pallets of your published book.

The three months surrounding your book launch are a time of intense activity. With the right chemical mix of traditional publicity and social media, you can be sure that your book continues to make sales long after the launch is over.

A Media Kit Is Rocket Fuel for Your Book Launch

A media kit helps establish your credibility and enhances your reputation before you even start your marketing campaign. This means buying resistance to your books will be much lower. People will be more inclined to believe in you when you have a solid reputation.

A media kit is a branded set of marketing materials that’s rich with content, not hype. It includes collateral material for journalists, book reviewers, talk show hosts, bloggers and consumers. Frequently a time-starved journalist won’t take a minute to look into the media kit to make their decision about whether to cover you. They’ll rely on the summary you provide. If your information is complete and looks professional, they will simply use the material you have given them.

People in the media don’t have time to read your book, so make it easy for them to understand your work. If you are considerate of their needs, they are more inclined to cover the story of you and your book.

Include sample interview questions in your media kit. Radio and TV personalities especially love these. Journalists love to see list of tips that they can reprint in connection with your book. All media people love to use quotes and sound bites, so feed them what they want.

Above all, make sure you provide your contact information right up front. In fact it should be on every part of your media kit and every page of your website. No one should ever have to guess how to reach you.

Do you have questions about what to include in your book media kit? Click here for the 5 essential elements of a book media kit.

By leveraging traditional media, you can launch your book to stellar status join – maybe even join the galaxy of published superstars. The only question that remains is, how high do you want to go?




Bryan Edired 1Bryan Heathman is the President of Made for Success Publishing. Bryan works with bestselling authors in the role of publisher and marketer, including the late Zig Ziglar, Chris Widener and John C. Maxwell. Bryan is the author of Conversion Marketing, a marketing book that condenses knowledge on website conversion from 7-years running an online ad agency. Bryan’s Fortune 500 experience includes running high impact marketing campaigns for Microsoft, Eastman Kodak and Xerox.






Katherine-Owen-ImageBrought to you by Katherine Owen, CEO of GOKO. Katherine brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. She owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.


icon1September 22, 2015
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3 Steps to Grow Brand Recall: Has anyone got a tattoo of your brand?


A brand serves as an important placeholder for your company’s reputation. This means good business for you and peace of mind for your customers. When people have a good experience with a brand, they’re more likely to make a repeat purchase. In other words, they become brand loyal, even when given the choice to buy a competing product. This leads to brand recall, and the cycle repeats itself resulting in enormous growth potential.

Tattoo artist at work, close-up Here’s something to contemplate. Rumor has it that more people have the motorcycle brand Harley-Davidson™ tattooed on their body than any other brand name in the world. Whether its truth or fiction, it’s at least plausible. Now that’s loyalty!

If you’ve been reading my series on Branding, by now you now that we’re talking about a process of creating distinctive and durable perceptions in the minds of your customers. We do this by distilling what your company represents down to its purest essence- something that your target audience can grasp in a matter of moments – a look, a feel, a song, a sound.

The effort to brand your company or yourself can pay off handsomely, sometimes to the tune of billions of dollars. In my branding talks, I refer to this as a business’ growth factor. The brand of the #1 soft drink company in the world is so tightly monitored – so Mega – that I’m at risk using their name in this article for possible intellectual property right infringement.

However, that company’s CEO once famously said he could walk into any bank anywhere in the world and take out a loan….based on their brand value alone! Imagine that kind of clout in your business.

In fact, this soda company’s global market penetration is so strong that people can identify the white-on-red logo even without seeing the brand name. I don’t even have to say their name, but I’m sure you know which soda company I’m talking about. We’re talking about a growth factor to salivate over.

People who closely identify with a brand are not only more likely to buy what they bought a second time, but they also will buy related items from the same brand. In fact, they’ll recommend the brand to others and even remain brand faithful in spite of a competitor’s price cut. That’s the kind of brand identity that anchors true loyalty and spurs mega growth.

I know you’re asking “How can I relate this to my business?”

So the question to ponder is this…how can you take these lessons and generate your own brand growth factor? Here are 3 practical recommendations to get your customers to stick to make repeat purchases.

1. Make It Memorable:

Your company can’t benefit from referrals and repeat business if people don’t remember your name. When it comes to making your brand memorable, try using an unusual color combination, the way FedEx does with their purple and orange. Use shapes and sounds that convey your brand’s image, or even distinctive behavior or gesture. Jingles, cartoon characters and spokesmen are great for this.

We all remember our first trip to Les Schwab Tires, because the mechanics are trained to drop their tools and literally run to your car to provide service. Savvy career professionals use a style of clothing to make their personal brand memorable. Author Tom Wolfe was known for his famous white suits, and Flo from Progressive Insurance is unmistakable with her retro look and flippant attitude.

Develop your own unique image and make it stick in the minds of your buying public.

2. Keep It Familiar:

Branding has a big effect on customers and non-customers alike. Think about that catchy jingle that just won’t get out of your head. It’s familiar, isn’t it?

Psychologists have found that familiarity leads to affinity. In other words, when people get to know you, they like you. This means people who have never even done business with you may recommend you even when they’re not your customers – simply because they know your brand. Seeing your ads around town, having one of your pens in their desk drawer, or seeing your social media posts all add up to contributing to your growth factor. Those who are familiar with your brand will spread the word the next time a friend or colleague is looking for your kind of referral.

3. Be Rock Solid:

When consumers make a buying decision, there’s less risk in choosing a brand name over an unknown commodity. With an established brand, you can spread the respect you’ve garnered. This means your latest, greatest product, service or location can gain acceptance in spite of newcomer status. But start by being reliable in the first place. Mind your reputation, and keep it clean.

For fun, I play the jazz trombone in a 17-piece swing band. Recently our band was hired to perform in our region’s largest winery, Chateau Ste Michelle, where we delighted visitors with party music to augment their wine tasting experience at the chateau. Ste Michelle established a good reputation with regional winery tours which are close to a major metropolitan city, thereby solidifying its brand and goodwill with millions of wine lovers. Subsequently, the winery added brand extensions to their mix with new sub-brands at various price points. With this approach, the primary brand benefits from the positive perceptions generated from both their premier line and their affordable line.

Following these 3 steps to brand recall can lift what you sell out of the realm of a commodity and contribute to your growth factor. Instead of dealing with price-shoppers, you’ll have customers who would gladly pay more for your company’s goods and services.

Who could ask for anything more?

Katherine-Owen-ImageKatherine Owen, CEO of GOKO, brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. Katherine owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.






Inspiring Leaders at your Fingertips

Get access to some of the world’s top minds on Leadership and Motivation in this new iPhone app.This powerful library in a unique universal app will motivate and inspire you to change and improve your life and the lives of others.

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This collection of life-changing audios includes masterpieces on personal improvement, inspiration, leadership and business success from famous speakers, authors, thinkers and self-made millionaires.

FREE audio with download,“Resolving Conflict” by professional speaker and coach Tony Alessandra. Learn invaluable tips on how to deal with conflict and create positive resolution.

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icon1May 26, 2015
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Creating Desire: The Heart of Branding


People make buying decisions with their hearts and try to justify those decisions with their heads. Yet true desire can’t be rationalized. How many times have you yourself said, “I dunno… I just WANT it!”

burning_heart_by_dracu_teufel666-d49u67jBrand advertising takes an otherwise ho-hum product and incites a burning passion in the buyer’s mind. The product becomes associated with a certain lifestyle, frame of mind or emotional state. This is the soul of aspirational branding.

“What’s Love Got to Do with It?” ~ Tina Turner, circa 1984

The mark of an exceptional branding campaign is when your audience feels passion. And how can we inspire passion?

An effective brand gets the message across as succinctly, as efficiently as possible. It says that something really great is now available, and savvy folks can take advantage of it. Does that sound a bit like romance? It should. And marketers have capitalized on it from the beginning.

Take for example a slice of this car commercial from the early 1990′s. A sexy middle-aged celebrity spokeswoman enters the frame of a pale fog gray set, the kind where the floor meets the wall at some indistinct point in the infinite background.

Her eyes sparkle. There’s a slight bounce in her step, but she’s cool and confident. The soft lighting adds a whisper of halo to her honey colored hair.

She’s there with The Car, speaking in direct address to the camera. “Cars are like men. Some you want to date, some you want to marry.”

Zing! And there it is: tightly focused, painfully poignant, reaching through the television and clenching the heart of women across the land.

So what is this ad saying?

“Are you in, or are you out? You love this car, that’s clear. Are you going to buy it or take a walk? If you want to be like me, then do what I do. Drive what I drive. Live my lifestyle. Decide you’re worth it. But do decide. Time’s up!”

With the right branding, desire turns attraction into commitment. It cuts to the chase and drives the point home with such crystalline clarity, it makes the buyer say, “I dunno… I just WANT it!” before they can even formulate the idea into words.

In the blink of an eye, all doubt is removed. It’s only a matter of their finding a rational justification to support the purchase.

Where do I sign?

Vance Packard, author of The Hidden Persuaders, made it his mission to demystify the world of advertising for the average consumer. Though his slant was a bit biased against advertisers, his points can be mined for effective use in everyday business branding.

Packard identified eight human needs that effective branding appeals to. These essential eight needs include emotional security, reassurance of worth, ego-gratification, creative outlets, love objects, a sense of power, a sense of roots, and immortality.

Speaking to these basic human needs means meeting your prospect at their deepest level. It means speaking their language, and giving them permission to invest in with you.

When your brand’s message speaks convincingly to these core desires, the response from the buyer is automatically primal. The only question they have left to ask is, “Where do I sign?”

Katherine-Owen-ImageKatherine Owen, CEO of GOKO, brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. Katherine owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia. Check out cutting-edge work in the field of publishing with Katherine’s latest mobile app published by GOKO Publishing’s U.S. partner, Made For Success Publishing.


icon1April 27, 2015
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Could Your Brand Inspire A Gold Rush?


by Bryan Heathman

Have you ever experienced the frenzy of a gold rush? I have, so let me tell you a story of what it is like to experience the exhilaration of a gold rush!

My experience was not a gold rush in the traditional sense. You see, a traditional gold rush looks like this… I live in Seattle which has roots in the gold rush era, where 100,000 prospectors from Seattle and San Francisco raced to Alaska during the 1896 Klondike Gold Rush. In this gold rush, a select few of the prospectors got rich. Interestingly, it was the merchants in Seattle and San Francisco who got rich selling supplies to miners on their way to Alaska, who were required by the Canadian Government to stock-up on items such as packs, non-perishable food, denim jeans, picks and shovels.

My gold rush experience was far different, but was equally as competitive as the Alaskan gold rush. In the late 1990’s, there was a phenomenon knows as the “Dot.com boom”. I was one of the figurative miners, known as a Dot.com’er, working to figure-out ways to commercialize this new thing called the Internet or the Information Superhighway. I was fortunate to have worked for Microsoft during this period and learned the ropes from a big technology company. So I ventured-off, climbing up the equivalent of Chilkoot Pass (pictured above), and helped pioneer a company in the online advertising industry.

Gold RushBut did you know that there is gold just about everywhere you look, even today? What if you could create a gold rush for your products or services without competing in the fast moving business of technology?

The magic is right in front of you – in your brand. You’ll find customers just about everywhere. But until your brand addresses the needs of a SPECIFIC audience, you could easily wind up prospecting in the wrong place. All your effort will be wasted, and you could end up tired, cold and broke just like the thousands of men trudging through the Alaskan wilderness.

The reason behind a successful brand is simple. If you don’t know your customer demographics, you may try to make your brand appeal to everyone. An axiom which I teach in branding is that when you try to appeal to everyone, you wind up appealing to no one at all. When your logo, slogan, sales videos, website and marketing materials are geared toward the wrong demographic, you wind up turning off potential buyers.

In order for your business to hit paydirt, focus your company’s brand so that it appeals to the needs and desires of a select few versus the teeming masses. These select few will thank you for it with their wallets. Let me share 3 simple tricks on figuring-out what your audience looks like.

Know Thy Field

Before you brand your company, you need to know who your customers are – their demographics. Knowing your ideal customer’s profile is essential to your company, your branding and ultimately your sales conversions.

Knowing this information will let you focus on targeting the right audience and on their specific desires, setting yourself up for success. With a little research and planning, you will have the keys to branding success.

You can use this information to craft all of your promotions and messaging. When you know what your customer looks like, then you have found your golden customer-base.

Suppose your best customers are female, college educated, married, suburban, with an average age of 35. This population has a specific set of likes, dislikes, pleasures and pains. They tend to have a common perspective, even their own lingo.

Knowing this empowers you to speak to them in their language and address their desires. These people will want different things, even look at the world differently than blue collar men over 55, or urban college kids just starting out in life.

You need to know everything you can about your audience – their gender, age, amount of education, income, profession, geographic location, hobbies – everything that influences their buying decisions.

Without this information, you can’t put a face on your audience. Sales conversion becomes a roll of the dice. With this information, you can dominate your marketplace.

The good news is that others have had this challenge before you, and I’d like to share 3 tools for getting the job done is less than an hour. There are three benchmark websites you can use to figure this out, and we’ll cover them in a moment. Learning to use them in the right sequence will provide you with a 3-step system that sets up your brand for success.

Roll Up Your Sleeves and Start Mining

The way look for gold is to start looking. Take advantage of these powerful resources to get to know the sweet spot of your marketplace. Then start addressing their desires.

There is more good news…these sites are all free to use and do not require any technical know-how. All it takes to begin prospecting for your ideal customers is to roll up your sleeves and get to work.

  1. Competition: Know your target market. Head over to Google.com to research your marketplace and locate the top five competitors in your field. To start, enter the keywords that are most closely related to your field or product, then review the top search results that Google displays.

    Take a look at the websites of specific competitors, and get a feel for what they offer. How are they addressing the needs of your demographic? Your competition has invested heavily in market research, both time and money. Leverage their assets for your own advantage.

  2. Traffic: Go to Alexa.com and look up your competitors’ websites. Enter the domains (the website URLs) of your top competitors into the search box. This will show you how popular your competitors are worldwide, as well as locally. Where is their traffic coming from? How are those traffic hubs satisfying the needs of your customers? Is there a lesson you can mine here?

  3. Demographics: Go to Quantcast.com to research demographics for the sites you’ve found. What kinds of people are using these websites? How much money do they make? Are they married? Do they have kids? How long did they go to school? Where do they live?

Quantcast measures market profiles and displays the demographic information for free, which offers you a slick marketing advantage indeed. However, because the service is elective, not every website you research will be Quantified. That means the demographics you’re looking for may not be available. You might need to search for several sites before you hit paydirt and find real the real gold – market data. Keep digging. What you’re looking for is out there.

For the business executives who take the time to know their market, the job of mining for new customers comes naturally. No shovels or pick-axes are required!

Bryan BWBryan Heathman is the President of Made for Success. He has worked with bestselling authors such as Zig Ziglar, Donald Trump and John C. Maxwell in the role of publisher, rainmaker and marketer. Download the Sales & Success mobile app to start your journey with free access to audios by Brian Tracy, Zig Ziglar and Dr. Larry Iverson.







Katherine-Owen-ImageKatherine Owen, CEO of GOKO, brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. Katherine owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.






Inspiring Leaders at your Fingertips

Get access to some of the world’s top minds on Leadership and Motivation in this new iPhone app.This powerful library in a unique universal app will motivate and inspire you to change and improve your life and the lives of others.

Leadership App

This collection of life-changing audios includes masterpieces on personal improvement, inspiration, leadership and business success from famous speakers, authors, thinkers and self-made millionaires.

FREE audio with download,“Resolving Conflict” by professional speaker and coach Tony Alessandra. Learn invaluable tips on how to deal with conflict and create positive resolution.

learn-more
icon1April 20, 2015
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The Inclusion/Exclusion Principle of Branding


When did you attend your last professional networking event? It was probably not too long ago. From holiday parties to corporate mixers, we’ve all been there. Mixing and mingling is what it’s all about, getting to know interesting looking people around us, meeting new colleagues, letting our hair down and finding glamorous new opportunities. Ah, what an exciting concept!

But once you’re there, what does your experience look like? If you’re like most people, you grab a beverage, walk through the gathering crowd and look for people you know, thinking there’s safety in numbers. You want to have a good time, sure – a little excitement is all that’s called for, playing it safe, nothing too crazy.

We can do it_bandwagon Marketing1200x1200 What you’re looking for is called Inclusion.

And then it happens: you meet someone you don’t know. After trading names, what’s the first thing they say? They ask you The Question: “What do you do?”

Ah, The Question… so much is wrapped up in that one little query. A world of meaning is woven into it, and your answer in those first 5 seconds will have more impact on your relationship with that person than anything else for the rest of your interaction.

Your answer to The Question could mean all the difference between a passing encounter at a party and a long term commitment.

The same is true of your business. How you come across – your branding – means all the difference between a passing prospect and a committed buyer who gives you years of repeat business. Your brand is the answer to The Question about your company.

The Decision

Creating a strong, memorable and compelling brand is essential for successful marketing. It only takes a bit of thought and a smattering of research, yet it may be the single most important decision you can make about your company.

You have to decide how you want to come across to your customers. Your brand is the set of expectations they maintain about your product and what they will tell their friends, neighbors and colleagues about you.

More than just a name or a logo, your brand is infused into your buyer’s total experience with your company. It’s expressed in every touch with your customer, from their first glimpse of your website, to their experience with your products or services.

If they like your brand, customers will choose you over your competitors every time, even if your product costs a little more – sometimes especially if your product costs more.

In fact, if you can offer your customers a way to fit in while qualifying for membership in a select group, you’ve found the Holy Grail.

The Bandwagon Marketing Paradox

Bandwagon marketing embraces the idea that since everyone else is doing it, it must be a good thing. If they want to fit in, they just have to buy the product. Inclusion may be had for a small investment.

Peer pressure is definitely a factor here. Consumer confidence is also fueled by hard data available online. Blogging, social media, reviews and ratings -such factors influence buying decisions mightily.

Demonstrating that your brand is widely accepted will go a long way toward qualifying your prospects, making them want to fit into the crowd who’ve already engaged with you.

Closing the sale becomes a matter of tactfully turning The Question on them, basically “Are you in, or are you out?”

The Inclusion/Exclusion Principle

Bandwagon marketing is in direct contrast to the Inclusion/Exclusion Principle. Since branding is all about creating product associations in the minds of consumers, brand exclusion seems at odds with getting people to support your company brand.

Excluding people from your brand assumes taking a posture which implies that your product or service is such high quality that only a very few can acquire it. Scarcity is the key here, and people tend to want what they can’t have. Using the Inclusion/Exclusion Principle is aspirational by definition. It’s exclusive.

Think of auto brands such as BMW, Mercedes Benz or Lexus. Are they expensive? That’s relative. Good quality? Reasonably so. Are they so exclusive they’re out of reach? Probably. A friend of mine got a great deal on a used BMW. But he learned the Inclusion/Exclusion Principle the hard way, when he discovered that he signed-up for paying $800 for a simple oil change on that used BMW.

Integrating Bandwagon marketing with the Inclusion/Exclusion Principle results in a psychology that implies both scarcity and compliance with group norms. Using the Inclusion/Exclusion Principle, owning your product allows a consumer to fit into a very select, discerning group.

In all cases, your brand needs to respond to your target market’s ongoing desires. For example if you are marketing to BMW owners, consider organizing nationwide events such as performance driving sessions at local race tracks. The one thing that’s certain not to change, is a buyer’s need to belong. When you target that need for inclusion and make your customers feel special at the same time, you’ve struck a chord. The result could be a brand relationship that lasts a lifetime!

Katherine-Owen-ImageKatherine Owen, CEO of GOKO, brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. Katherine owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.






Inspiring Leaders at your Fingertips

Get access to some of the world’s top minds on Leadership and Motivation in this new iPhone app.This powerful library in a unique universal app will motivate and inspire you to change and improve your life and the lives of others.

Leadership App

This collection of life-changing audios includes masterpieces on personal improvement, inspiration, leadership and business success from famous speakers, authors, thinkers and self-made millionaires.

FREE audio with download,“Resolving Conflict” by professional speaker and coach Tony Alessandra. Learn invaluable tips on how to deal with conflict and create positive resolution.

learn-more
icon1April 19, 2015
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Aspirational Branding-What does THAT mean?


Let’s start by defining a prestigious brand. Does your brand promote a feeling of Aspiration? Better yet, does your brand have what it takes to kick start a movement?

How are you creating prestige for your brand, and what are you doing to influence your buyers?

Aspirational brands appeal to people who desire something better. They buy products with “prestige appeal.” From a business standpoint, businesses who sell products/services with prestige typically enjoy very high profit margins. When creating a Brand strategy, they will make ownership just out of reach for most people. Meaning, their buyers may need to aspire to engage.

On the other hand, an Inspirational brand is a product that’s produced to satisfy the wants or needs of everyday needs and desires. Basically, it’s a commodity like toothpaste or bananas. How do you inspire consumers to purchase a commodity product?

With an Inspiration brand, the logo on the label matters but does not align with the identity of the consumer. The product is commonplace. This applies to everyday things like orange juice, auto tires or coffee. The buyer believes quality varies across brands, but you have to shout to be heard above the noise in the marketplace through advertising and promotional tactics (i.e. direct mail, coupons or purchasing in-store display space).

The Absolute Opposite of Ordinary

The other day I received a direct mail piece that caught my attention. In fact, the skilled marketer who created this mailer “set the hook” so effectively that I have the brochure sitting next to my computer.

Yes, I’m kind of embarrassed to admit that I actually saved a piece of direct mail.

The tagline on the brochure says ” The Absolute Opposite of Ordinary.” Hmmm, I think.

This brand is obviously trying to distance itself from the commodity brand.

The product this company is selling has all the hallmarks of an aspirational brand. It is expensive. The brand is associated with quality. The products are rare and you don’t see many people using it. But when you do see this brand, the discerning eye takes notice. This is the perfect situation for an aspirational brand.

So I open-up the flyer and the first thing I note is the thick paper and high gloss printing. The photography used in the flyer is stunning – crisp in detail. The copy is minimalistic, so I can read it instantly. Here are some of the phrases they used:

“Discover the extraordinary details.”

“Take control.”

“We invite you to experience dynamic and distinctive driving, firsthand”

Well, if you haven’t guessed it yet this flyer was for a new model of car. But by the time I flipped to the 5th page of the flyer I was shocked by what I discovered. In my minds-eye the brand of this vehicle, Maserati, is out of my reach. But the “call to action” message in this flyer made me think differently….in fact, the arresting discovery made me think that I could aspire to own one of these vehicles. You see, the company is promoting a new model of Maserati that is priced lower to compete with mainstream luxury vehicles.

So all of a sudden, I’m their target market.

Exhilarating Performance is Just a Click Away

Your brand is at the core of what you do. What feelings or emotions does your business inspire in your customers? Think about how you present your brand, not just on your website but whenever you meet people, connect with them on social networks, or even in your direct mail flyers.

How are you setting yourself apart, making people aspire to own your product? What is it you do that makes you stand out from the crowd? Think about your brand around your unique strengths and go forth to generate a new level for your customer to aspire.

Katherine-Owen-ImageKatherine Owen, CEO of GOKO, brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. Katherine owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.






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icon1April 13, 2015
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Leverage – The Secret to Reinforcing Your Brand Recall


by Bryan Heathman

Is there some secret branding sauce you can slather onto a marketing message that is otherwise dry as toast? Does your brand need to be as searing as a blacksmith’s red hot poker, scorched into the buyer’s mind? Does it need to be cooked up over some sorcerer’s caldron during the dark of the moon and sprinkled like fairy dust onto your logo?

Quote_On-emotional-connection-in-branding_K2MD-Brand-Consulting_Albuquerque-NM-1

When I started an ad agency called iPromotions.com back in the ’90s, I got a lot of questions like these about branding. Whether the client was a venture capital funded start-up or a half-billion dollar brand, the misconceptions about branding were remarkably the same.

These branding questions are good – but fortunately the answer to these questions is no. In fact, I wish I’d written a book about brand messaging before. I could have upped my fees, back in the day.

So then how do you use your brand to reach more people and successfully market your products or services?

In reality, your brand is like a simple device. You use this device over and over again to put across the essence of your company. It’s boiled down to a simple image of what you represent. The operative word here is “simple.”

Let’s play a little game. What are the Brands you associate with these slogans?

“Oh, what a feeling!”
“The King of Beers”
“The happiest place on earth”
“Just do it”
“American by Birth. Rebel by choice”

How did you do on your brand recall? Show me your brand savvy and post the Brands associated with these taglines onto Katherine’s facebook Facebook page. That last one is a little hard…

To Woo or Not To Woo

Branding is an ongoing process, not a one-time event. Your brand needs to reflect the needs of your marketplace. It needs to be both classic and timely. It begins with your startup phase and never stops.

Because it’s simple, your brand needs to be repeated to be effective. Conversely, because it needs to be repeated, it must be simple. Here’s why.

The average person has to be exposed to information 7 to 15 times before acting on it. Even a highly intelligent person requires at least 3 exposures to that same information in order to retain it and internalize it. That means if you’re not reinforcing your brand, you’re leaving money on the table.

Consider your customers’ experience as they go through their day to day activities. Your message, sales proposition and your brand are a blip in a sea of messages.

Your brand needs to be powerful enough to rouse your customers into action, and at the same time it needs to actively express you – what you’re about and the uniqueness of your offering. In fact, for people to decide to hire you or buy from you at all, your brand needs to be crystal clear, exciting and alluring. It needs to stand up to relentless reinforcement.

We learn by repetition. I think about the power of repetition every time I automatically start singing-along with songs from my high school days.

The question is, did you set out to learn those words by heart? Or did you just pick them up after hearing the song a hundred times? Once you catch a sonic glimpse of the song’s chorus, how easy is it to get that song out of your head? Odds are that it’s not easy at all. It’s catchy. Persistent. Relentless, even.

So it goes with branding. Once you design your marketing message, carry it forward through all your promotional materials. Consistently use your slogan, logo and other brand elements throughout your marketing materials and other types of customer communication. Let it be persistent.

Branding is Like the Wheels on A Bike

In order to get your message across in all its subtle glory, it needs to be simple and seamlessly circular…. like the wheels on a bike. It needs to go around and around in your prospect’s head like that song on the radio.

You may feel a bit self-conscious about repeating yourself, thinking that your prospects might become bored with your message if you use it too often. In reality, brand repetition equates to consistency in the vast majority of consumers’ minds.

Using this tactic lends a sense that your business is bigger than it actually is. It also lends consistency to your message, regardless of which rookie on your staff is trying his level best to louse it all up (LOL). Brand repetition means consistency.

Do you want to see the latest branding our action? The tagline for the company is “You Tell the Story. We Tell the World.” Follow this link to GOKO Publishing to see how this brand slogan is used to reinforce the company’s mission.



Bryan Edired 1Bryan Heathman is the President of Made for Success. He works with bestselling authors such as Zig Ziglar, Donald Trump and John C. Maxwell in the role of publisher, rainmaker and marketer. Bryan is the author of Conversion Marketing, a marketing book on converting website visitors into paying customers. Bryan’s Fortune 500 experience includes working for Microsoft, Eastman Kodak and Xerox.




Katherine-Owen-ImageKatherine Owen, CEO of GOKO, brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. Katherine owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.


icon1April 6, 2015
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Falling In Love With Your Future


Is there a secret formula for Leadership? No, it’s not really a secret.

Being an exceptional Leader requires passion, commitment and intuitive vision. In a word, it takes heart.

If you have a passion for the thrill and independence of being a Leader, plus you have the commitment to follow through on that passion, here is a breakout formula that can take you wherever you want to go. Falling in love with your future is as simple as letting your heart lead the way.

Research

Do-things-with-passion-or-not-at-all-Wherever-you-go-go-with-all-your-heartFirst you have to know where you’re going, so research is key. Find a successful cause or company similar to the one you envision leading. Study how it started and how it grew.

Next, learn all you can about the Leader behind it. Pick apart the Leadership style, and see if you can ferret out the steps or elements involved.

Devour books and publications related to your Leadership concept. Talk to other Leaders and ask them about their best practices.

Vision

A successful Leader is a bold visionary, seeing what others cannot. You have to be willing to follow that vision despite naysayers.

Many Leaders never finished college, but that hasn’t stopped them. Some visionaries started small companies that grew into large enterprises, such as Dell Computer. Other captains of industry chose to stay small, like your favorite neighborhood bistro or that consulting firm your friend owns in Kansas City.

Regardless of the size of their teams, they’ve all relied heavily on their vision – not necessarily on an MBA program.

Leaders handle ambiguity with ease and are fearless pacesetters. They get a thrill out of leading the way into unfamiliar territory and thumb their noses at the word “failure.”

Let other people manage the details for you, but keep a tight hold on your vision. You must be the guiding force that inspires your people to follow that vision. Shoulder the responsibility for the outcome, and hold yourself personally accountable. Let your passion for your cause show you the way. Focus on the big picture and trust others to focus on the details.

Strategy & Action

When you know where you’re going, the only thing missing is the strategy for getting you there combined with the courage to act. But this is no small thing. Jumping into Leadership without a strategic plan is like jumping in the ocean without knowing how to swim. You may reap unfortunate consequences and discover it all too late.

To create the strategic plan, picture your outcome exactly as you want it to be. Then write down your goals and objectives for achieving that vision. For each goal, create a strategy and a target date for achieving it. Begin with the end in mind, and work backwards until you reach the position you’re in today.

Assess your strengths. The odds are that you already possess the knowledge, skill and experience your team will draw upon. Now list all the strengths you can apply to reaching the object of your ambition.

Then appraise your challenges. Maybe they involve market penetration, profitability, expertise, competition or location. Challenges change as your objective changes. How will your challenges impact your goals?

Be willing to act. You can get things done by delegating, outsourcing or leveraging other people’s talents. Being a Leader means tapping untold reserves of innovation and unflagging determination. It means being willing to endure long, fast-moving days if you want to reap the rewards.

Get things done through delegation, and create a framework of people who can help you achieve your vision as a Leader. Even if your plan means working solo, you can benefit from accessing all kinds of talented consultants, vendors or subcontractors. Expect your framework to change as your vision grows, but build it only as big as you need it to be.

Katherine-Owen-ImageKatherine Owen, CEO of GOKO, brings her expertise in the publishing industry and combines it with a powerful team. Katherine owns and operates GOKO Publishing and is part-owner in a traditional publishing company, The GHR Press. Katherine holds a Masters Degree in Marketing and Management from Macquarie University’s Graduate School of Management (MGSM) in Sydney, Australia.






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icon1March 16, 2015
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Effective Leadership – the 7 C’s of Getting Result


Have you ever been cornered into buying something you didn’t really want? If you’re like most people, you’ve stocked your cupboards with more than your fair share of Girl Scout Cookies and other non-essentials sold door to door by smiling, big-eyed neighbor kids. It’s almost impossible to resist.

Good LeasdershipTime and again, people in cultures around the world have exhibited certain predictable responses to everyday situations. In fact, you see it everywhere. Because of these common reactions, it’s possible to predict behavior and influence people to adopt a specific point of view.

Unfortunately our common reactions make it possible for us to be manipulated by the unscrupulous – or simply the big-eyed cookie vendor. Politicians, salespeople, network marketers, entrepreneurs, colleagues, friends and family all have a stake in getting us to agree to their requests.

However, there is much to be mined here for the sake of effectiveness on the job.

If you find yourself in a Leadership role, you can gain from the gentle art of persuasion and take a cue from these common responses. You can apply the concept to Leadership for consistent results that look good on you – and your business. With the right approach, you can turn the tables and start getting the results you want.

Navigating the 7 C’s

There are 7 essentials for effective Leadership that you can apply to your projects or your organization starting today. They all happen to start with the letter “C”. In no particular order, here they are.

Care – Influence of any kind requires rapport. This means you have to care to some degree about the people you want to influence. What do you have to offer that will benefit them? What’s their greatest pain? What are their aspirations? Remember that people are most responsive to those who are interested in them and share common values.

The famous landmark book by Dale Carnegie, How To Win Friends and Influence People, can be summed up in two words: genuine interest. You can use your voice and body language to demonstrate your sincere enthusiasm, and make eye contact to get full engagement.

Communicate with Questions – Listen first. Communication is an interchange of information – a two-way street. Getting your message across depends on hearing and responding to the other person’s point of view. Learn from your interactions with them. Ask questions. Care about their responses, and express your expectations clearly.

Listening isn’t merely a matter of waiting for your turn to speak. Don’t wait quietly then jump in to tell your story. Make sure you ask questions and thoroughly understand their point of view. Be careful in your responses so your conversation doesn’t appear to be a verbal competition. Let it be cooperative.

Clarify – Not only do you want to get clear on your own your core values, but you also want to get clear on what people are communicating to you. A psychologist named Carl Rogers perfected a process called Reflective Listening back in the 50′s (click here for an overview on Wikipedia). When you ask clarifying questions, this will show up in your “music” – the things you say and the way you say them. When you’re clear on your own position, it’s much easier to persuade others to your point of view.

Consider – If the other person has a different perspective, find out more about why they have that point of view. The more you consider the reasons behind their thinking, the more you can understand them or perhaps help them to better understand your point of view. Weigh all sides of the question, and take the full picture into consideration.

Competence – Understand the details of the process that you and your team are pursuing. Enjoy at least a top line level of knowledge about the steps involved in completing your objective. When you do, it will be easier to understand the needs of the people you’re leading. Bringing in the project according to your objectives will be a breeze.

Consistency – Research shows that we have an in-born desire to be and to appear consistent. Once we’ve made a decision, we feel pressure to act consistently with that commitment. Once a commitment is made, we tend to table the topic and consider the matter settled.

Back in 1998, a Chicago restaurant was plagued with last minute reservation cancellations. But when they started asking customers for a commitment in the form of a question – “Will you please call if you have to change your plans?” – the no-show rate fell from 30% to 10%. To be effective as a Leader, ask your people if they will commit, and wait for their response. Require their consistency. Likewise, be consistent with your own commitments, and you’ll lead your people by example.

Completion – Personal accountability from yourself as well as your team will mean the difference between success and failure. Complete your objectives, and follow through. Don’t allow the agenda to change week by week.

Do you hold people individually responsible for meeting company objectives? When your people fail, as we all do from time to time, do you hold them responsible for sharing the benefit of their hard-won wisdom with the group? Have you created a culture that values personal accountability as a tool? Are you rewarding people for taking personal ownership for big-picture results?

To be an effective leader, it’s essential to stay in touch with the people you’re leading. It’s starts with caring about them and your mission. It takes involvement with them through the unfolding process and seeing it through to the end.

It means choosing activities and objectives that are worthwhile – appropriate for you, your values and dreams. Otherwise you might as well be selling non-essentials door-to-door. Those jobs are already filled by worthy, big-eyed 6-year-olds. You wouldn’t want to compete with the Girl Scouts, would you? No, of course not.

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icon1February 9, 2015
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Leadership and Endurance: Staying Up When Things Look Down


Endurance-Shackleton

Everyday the world is made fresh, and no two days are alike. No one stays the same from day to day, or even moment to moment, because each experience brings new opportunities and fresh perspective.

We touched on this lightly in a previous article, Effective Leadership: Igniting the Vision for Others. You can tap this concept and put it to work on your behalf.

Today is a whole new day. Today your spouse is different. Your coworkers and colleagues are, too. Your friends and companions are 24 hours older today than they were yesterday, bringing with them a world of new encounters. Because of this, the way they think today is different from yesterday, no matter how slight that difference is.

If you keep this in mind, it will cast a fresh light on your world and your way of thinking. You can get to know them all over again each time you connect.

Even you are different.

Your cells are renewed constantly. I’m told that there isn’t a cell in your body that’s older than 7 years, right now, no matter what your birth certificate says.

If you trim an eighth of an inch off your fingernails, that means you cut away one month’s worth of growth. Think of all the things your fingertips touched in the past month, all the experiences your fingernails had during that brief span of time. Has your mind grown as much?

And what about your enthusiasm?

Does your perspective need a little freshness dating? Every now and then it’s a good idea to check the contents of your head and throw out the ideas that are past their peak.

Without even being aware of it, a repetitive routine can let boredom creep in, stale yawns trudging on the heels of monotony. Before you know it, your enthusiasm has tanked and you’re not sure why.

The Hazards of Breaking New Ground

If you’re in a position of Leadership, the habit of stale thinking can spread like a deadly-dull virus through your team and the others around you. If you’re not careful, it can spread to your home life and your other relationships too. This can play havoc with your success, both personally and professionally.

Here’s a case where maintaining a fresh perspective aboard a sinking ship was literally a matter of life and death. There’s much to be mined from it on the topic of Leadership.

About a hundred years ago, a crew of 27 men (and 70 sled dogs) led by Ernest Shackleton sailed from South Georgia Island in the southern Atlantic. Their intent was to land on the coast of Antarctica and trek across it shore to shore on foot, something no one else had done before. Unfortunately, they never even got to their destination.

The ocean between South America and Antarctica is notorious as a sailor’s graveyard, owing to high winds, deep swells and no small smattering of icebergs. Just six weeks after they began their voyage, the ship Endurance was lodged in an ice floe somewhere in the Weddell Sea. A few weeks later, it sank.

It took Shackleton and his crew some 18 months to return to South Georgia Island. During that time they camped on the ice, sailed across mountainous swells in little more than row boats, endured frostbite, hunger and desolation, never knowing if they’d see home again. But they persevered, and they did return.

It seems to me, if you were a crew member on the Endurance, you’d need a whole lot of enthusiasm for the taste of adventure. Just to get on the boat, you’d have to have a pretty tough inner game, a love of dogs, and a whole lot of gear.

You’d also need a very big idea about why the trip was necessary. There would be many chances to give up, all of them good ones.

The greatest threat to their successful return after the shipwreck was not so much the idea of quitting while they faced danger amid the storms and swells.

The greatest jeopardy to morale would have been the days on end of relative monotony – the cold, the gray, the unending sameness of their diet. There was no sound but their own voices, the wind, and the water lapping against the ice for the nearly 700 days of their journey.

The Rewards for Renewed Perspective

Surviving through this kind of ordeal takes a kind of camaraderie and a freshness of spirit that’s hard to find in this era or any other.

Every person on Shackleton’s team brought a set of skills essential for the mission. As a leader, Shackleton must have been keenly aware of this. Each one of the crew contributed a unique perspective to the group, along with the experiences gained during each whole new day. Together they persevered, and their survival itself was a triumph.

Whether you commute to work in an office, plow a field all day, or sit at home and knit, you are selecting the moments of your life and the thoughts that go along with them.

Now is a great time to give your enthusiasm a boost and see your surroundings through fresh eyes. Why not take time out for a little shift in perspective today?

You can give your doldrums the brush off while you trim your fingernails and think about where your fingers have been during the past month. If you find it dull, promise your hands that they’ll have a more stirring adventure to tell next time.

This article on Endurance and Enthusiasm is
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icon1January 26, 2015
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Leadership and Ambition: Get Your Dream Into High Gear


What’s your greatest ambition? Do you know where the road of life is taking you? Do you know who’s taking the ride with you – those who share your ambitions?

Ambition fuels your goals, ignites the fire of life that kindles behind your eyes. It makes smoke curl from your nostrils as the restless engine of your desire is stoked when you contemplate your ultimate success. It torques your actions into high gear, and impels those around you to act with vigor on your behalf.

Chasing The Horizon

For many people, the idea of getting a great job and staying with the same company is their ambition. However, this scenario is largely becoming a thing of the past and having three or more careers in a lifetime is now the norm. This fact carries with it both an opportunity and a daunting responsibility to become clear on your own ambitions.

Don’t Arrive by Accident

It’s all too common to find that you’ve arrived on your current path through a series of coincidences, each one taking you a little farther away from the dreams you had when you first started. For most people, there is a huge gap between the results they get and the results they want.

Whether starting your own company or as an employee, more and more people are unsure of their ambitions. If you’re one of them, maybe it’s time to take time out, sit back and have a talk with yourself.

For example, some years ago I had a buddy who was confronted by just such a challenge. When we were both fresh out of college, we both went to work for Xerox selling office copiers.

Jeff and I had met years before in college, bonding over Top Raman and the love of fast cars. Jeff drove a Porsche and we took that car to every pizza joint near our campus (my college car was a classic VW Fastback, no match for the Porsche). We both shared a passion for starting our own business and becoming the next Henry Ford. Some things just don’t need to be explained.

After college, he had a successful career with Xerox followed by stints with other Fortune 500 companies like HP and Dell. He worked his way up into an executive position, in time making a pretty good salary with cushy corporate benefits. He was tied to his job with a velvet rope, plush but limiting.

Let me say here that Jeff did not aspire to be a corporate employee. For years, Jeff would talk with me about getting the nerve to “make the jump” and pursue a tech start-up.

Once you’ve been in corporate life for a while, you may feel locked into your job and your plush lifestyle, the way my friend did. Unless you get in touch with your true ambitions, your only options are to move sideways to another company or to move upward in the hierarchy of the company.

So what do you do? The answer is to finally ask yourself that most elusive question: what do you want to be doing five years from now? Ten? Twenty? What is your true ambition?

These are the questions my friend Jeff avoided asking himself for years, as the time slipped by and the rut got deeper. If your own answer isn’t “exactly what I’m doing now” then what you need is decisive action. Not tomorrow: today.

What my friend didn’t realize is that forging out a life’s ambition, or a major definite purpose, isn’t all that difficult. He was afraid of taking a momentary step back in his lifestyle for the sake of pursuing his longtime dream of starting his own company.

Eventually Jeff got his chance, seizing an opportunity to exercise his expertise in mobile technology.

Over time, he grew his idea into a steady business with the CTO’s of major cellular phone companies. He even has staff, inventory and a schedule of glamorous tradeshows he attends on an annual circuit. It’s a career he loves, but he never would have gotten there without making a change – the thing he dreaded the most.

If you can free yourself from the fear and pessimism that commonly confront change, you can free up enormous reserves of energy to fuel your dreams.

Getting Your Goals Into High Gear

In order for things to get better, things have to change. Even if your ambition lies a bit farther down the road you’re already on, progress means change. Anything else will mean stagnation.

Whatever your ambition is, the chances are that there’s an opportunity for your next step not far away from where you are right now. The key to your dreams lies somewhere in your immediate surroundings.

If your ambition really is something you’ve seriously wanted to do, then it should be as simple as getting started and getting noticed. It’s okay to start small. If your first steps don’t work out the way you’d hoped, don’t give up. Keep your ambition in sight, letting it always fuel the passion for your dreams.

Whether you succeed or fail, it’s always better to try. At least you won’t find yourself years from now asking those two most terrible words: “What if…?”

Living out your ambition is not as hard to do as you think, especially when your actions are powered by your true passions. So what are you waiting for? Drop it down a gear and hit the gas! You never know what’s waiting for you around the bend.


icon1January 19, 2015
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Sheer Poetry: Composing Text, Email & Social Posts for Epic Effect


Social Media Marketing Flat IllustrationHave you ever gotten an electronic message and wondered when the author was going to get to the point? It hurts, doesn’t it?

It’s not that they were trying to waste your dwindling time with turgid prose reminiscent of Longfellow’s epic Song of Hiawatha. It’s just that you simply couldn’t fit their rambling stanzas about “the shores of Gitche Gumee” into your Twitter-constricted schedule. Let’s talk about how you can avoid becoming a text statistic, like your friend or colleague here. In our world of shrinking sound bytes, this shortage of attention means it’s more essential than ever to get to the point quickly. This doesn’t mean communication is becoming superficial. Far from it. It’s just more dense.

Is Brevity Beautiful or Banal?

In many ways, e-messages and social media present a new abbreviated form of communication so full of layered meaning, it’s almost poetic. The Japanese form of poetry known as the haiku has been lauded, jeered at, sneered at and ultimately left alone by Western society. Or has it? I’ll bet if you look closely, you’ll find that this 3-line, 17-syllable poetic format is the close cousin to many of the news bytes and electronic messages you read today. For example, see if this 3-line poem looks familiar…

Meeting is at ten
Bring me coffee and donuts
See you with bells on

Not an office jockey? Perhaps you might recognize this 17-syllable take on world news that could easily appear in a Yahoo feed…

Pod lands on comet
Rosetta makes history

Film at eleven

If you’re at all athletic, you might relate to this well-deserved gloat, inspired by the thrill of victory…

Smoked the tennis match
They said it couldn’t be done

Look out, Federer

I offer these examples to make a point. As silly as it may seem to compare daily drivel with a great and noble poetic art form, the aim is the same. Capture attention with compelling brevity, and communicate worlds of meaning in as brief a space as possible.

Wooing the Elusive Attention Span

Obviously your own messages don’t have to rhyme or be limited to three lines to be effective. However brevity is the soul of wit. You can win over your audience by respecting their tight schedules and their often harried frame of mind. Borrowing the acronym AIDA from the world of Sales, here is a technique you can adopt to make your written messages matter and move your readers to epic action.
  • A)ttention: To open, ask a question or make a statement that introduces your topic. Eg: “Is eating dinner important to you?”
  • I)nterest: Present the meat of the message, and state clearly why you’re initiating the contact. Eg: “I thought I might sport you to a meal tomorrow night.”
  • D)esire: Back up your message with relevant information so your audience can delve deeper if they desire. Cite sources and give links whenever it makes sense to do so. Eg: “This reviewer suggests linguine: http://MamaLovesItalian.com”
  • A)ction: Summarize the reason for your contact, and use a call to action if there’s a specific result you’d like to see. Eg: “Let’s mix things up a bit this week and have some fun. Ping me back with your reply, and I’ll make reservations.”
Following this formula can take you from zero to hero in 17 syllables or less. Coincidentally, this is also just about 140 characters, or the limit of half the world’s attention these days. I’m sure you get the point.
icon1December 2, 2014
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Like A Song On the Radio, Make Your Words Unforgettable


Pretty woman mouth blowing hand drawn icons and symbols close up

Your tone of voice can have a greater impact on your powers of persuasion than the words you use. There’s no doubt that your voice is a powerful instrument.

But what are you doing to control it? There are distinct methods to make your message as haunting or as catchy as a song on the radio so that people are singing your praises.

Think of a really memorable talk or presentation you attended recently – one that moved you or changed the way you view the world.

What was it that stayed with you? Was it the speaker’s words, or was it the tone of voice that moved you? The odds are high that the speaker’s passion came through – broke through the barriers of your mind so the words could captivate your heart.

Maybe you felt it in the quiver of their voice as they told an emotional story. Perhaps it was a sudden change in their volume – a whisper or a shout that rattled you in your boots.

You might have been influenced by their tone of voice when they asked a thought-provoking key question. Perhaps it was the sheer pace of the words – staccato as a machine gun – that tumbled out of a mouth straining to keep up with inspiration.

The fact that you’re thinking about it now is a testament to the power of the human voice.

How To Become Impossible To Forget

All of these elements tap the rich array of capabilities of the voice, making it possible to influence others and communicate with passion.

It’s the sad truth that too many discussions, speeches and presentations are easy to forget. And that’s a problem because the reason anyone would want to talk with you or listen to you is to engage in memorable, meaningful communication. One of the most potent yet often overlooked facets of vocal communication is the instrument itself – the voice.

Whether you’re addressing an audience of one or one thousand, you’re engaged in public speaking each time you open your mouth to speak in a public place.

So how are you coming across? When you speak, are people reminded of the dulcet tones of a rippling brook… or are they shrinking, as if from the shrill sound of fingernails slowly raked across a blackboard?

No matter where you find yourself today, as a novice or a master, you can learn to use your voice for a more lasting effect and become unforgettable.

Speaking of Dynamics…

The dynamics of your message will come through much more clearly when you color your message with a range of volume, tone and rhythm that conveys your emotional intensity. Your voice and intonation make all the difference in how you come across.

There are three basic elements that you can tap to ensure your verbal messages are understood – and remembered – time and again.

Volume:

Before you can communicate effectively, it’s essential that you really connect what you want to say, who you’re talking to, and why they might want to listen. Match the purpose of your words with your volume.

The human voice has a dramatic dynamic range, from the intensity of a whisper to the full, rich command of a shout. If your voice is too soft, you risk coming across as mousy. Too loud, and your audience will tune out. Make sure your message is fully heard so that people catch the full meaning of the important words you want to convey.

Tone:

Adjust your vocal quality to match your audience. Support your tone with a breath that stems from deep in your body cavity. Relax your tongue and throat, and allow your words to flow from a mouth that seems to savor them.

Your vocal quality or timbre, the way you articulate, and the rise and fall of your voice all contribute to your tone. Like the melody line of a song, you’re composing and singing your message all day long.

Rhythm:

Who are you speaking to? How much time do they have? How long is their attention span? What are their interests, beliefs and values? What do they share in common with others? How are they unique?

Each of these factors will influence the rhythm of your speech.

If you’ve been asked to give a eulogy at a good friend’s funeral, by all means, take your time. The dearly departed has probably earned it. There’s no shortcut here, and the members of the congregation are sure to appreciate the display of respect demonstrated in your slow, measured speech, savoring every last detail you painstakingly convey in your somber pace.

Slow thoughtful speech is the hallmark of a eulogy. If that’s your venue, take your time. Otherwise, cut to the chase.

Brevity is the soul of wisdom, and the rhythm of your speech has the power to convey a world of urgency or a casual note of nonchalance. Match your pace to the audience before you.

What do you want your audience to do as a result of your communication? What’s really at the heart of your message? By effectively using your voice in a measured, deliberate way, you can pack a powerful punch that drives your message home.

Communication is at the heart of all relationships and business dealings. Whether you’re connecting with an audience of one or a thousand, your experience can be a rich and rewarding one. Using your voice to full effect will mean the all the difference in creating a lasting impression.

  

icon1November 20, 2014
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